NFL Teams May Have Cops Research Prospects’ Tattoos

As if asking NFL prospects if they are heterosexuals or not wasn’t enough, now teams may start having police investigate a college footballer’s ink to see what the symbols, words, or images may represent—this in light of Aaron Hernandez’s murder arrest.

CBS Sports’ Bruce Feldman reported the news on Twitter.

Crossing a bit of a line, don’t ya think?

Lawsuits are making their way through the courts these days for employees being fired or not hired because of their activity on social media,which is a stretch in and of itself. Now imagine being subjected to standing in front of one or more police officers in nothing more than your skivvies as they question you about that cross that’s inked on your shoulder with a sheet draped over the arms with your best friend from high school who passed away’s name sewn on there. What the hell good is that going to do?

If the Pats had subjected Hernandez to that kind of treatment in 2010, would they really have passed on him? Maybe a simple background check—where they would’ve seen he had a history of running into trouble–would’ve sufficed. Or staying on top of him during his short three-year career would’ve helped.

Little else has been reported on this, so it’s not known exactly how far the investigating into tats would go, but if this were to be approved it would open an enormous can of worms. The league would basically be condoning profiling of potential prospects, and imagine how unbelievably uncomfortable this would make them feel.

While they’re at it though, and if this gets approved, how about they go back through all active players and look at their tats and question them? Players with shady looking tattoos might as well be subject to the same profiling. Have  gang symbol on your ass? Shred that contract up.

Sounds ridiculous, doesn’t it? Not only is it ridiculous, it’s borderline illegal.

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